The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

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Improving Radiation Therapy Efficiency

Fraunhofer MEVIS has developed new methods for adjusting radiation therapy more effectively during the course of treatment

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Self-learning software for better medical diagnoses

Together with Dutch researchers, Fraunhofer MEVIS is starting a project in which computer recognizes suspicious abnormalities in medical image data. MRI, CT, pathology: doctors have to consider medical image data –increasing in both amount and complexity – to perform diagnoses and monitor therapy.

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Press Releases

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  • The AI platform integrates rapid prototyping of clinical applications and immediate inspection of the AI's capabilities on clinical data — while the learning progresses.
    © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Bit by bit, computer assistants with the ability to learn are finding their way into hospitals and doctors’ practices. They support doctors during diagnosis and therapy planning. Until now, computer scientists played the primary role in designing and developing such ‘deep-learning’ algorithms. The Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Bremen, however, is now developing AI systems in close cooperation with physicians. In Chicago on November 26, Fraunhofer MEVIS researchers will present their first promising results at RSNA 2017, the most important radiology congress in the world.

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  • Artist Yen Tzu Chang at the MRI labor.
    © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Yen Tzu Chang is the recipient of the artist residency jointly hosted by Fraunhofer MEVIS and Ars Electronica in the framework of the “European Digital Art and Science Network.” Ars Electronica created the international initiative to enable artists to participate in residencies at prestigious research institutes to connect science with digital art approaches. Chang will present the results of her work during the performance of “Whose Scalpel” at the Ars Electronica Festival in Linz from September 7 to 11.

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  • Dosimetry in the liver
    © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Radioembolization is a therapy method used for liver tumors that are uncurable with surgery or chemotherapy. Thorough development of an individual planning is important for successful treatment. Within the SIRTOP project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Bremen is developing sophisticated computer algorithms to make therapy planning faster and more precise. The research team will present their initial results at several upcoming conferences.

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  • MRI supply regions of specific blood vessels
    © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    When diagnosing strokes and heart diseases or looking at tumors, perfusion magnetic resonance imaging offers a gentler way to capture the blood flow circulation in the organs. However, the method is far from being implemented to its full potential at many clinics. The Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Bremen, Germany is organizing a workshop entitled “Measurement of Perfusion and Capillary Exchange” from June 21 to 23 to promote adoption of the method. The event will provide information about its applications and the current state of research. With their joint research alliance, Siemens Healthineers and the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS will support physicians in finding the right course of therapy for their patients.

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  • Information integration and artificial intelligence for better diagnosis and therapy decisions

    Joint press release of Fraunhofer MEVIS and Siemens Healthineers, Bremen / Erlangen / 24.5.2017

    Volume rendering of vascular tree and metastases in the lung
    © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Research alliance between Fraunhofer MEVIS and Siemens Healthineers develops decision support systems for physicians based on deep machine learning. With their joint research alliance, Siemens Healthineers and the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS will support physicians in finding the right course of therapy for their patients.

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  • © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Focused ultrasound can effectively destroy tumor cells. Until now, this method has only been used for organs such as the prostate and uterus. At the European Congress of Radiology, Fraunhofer researchers will present a method, developed as part of the TRANS-FUSIMO EU project, that enables focused ultrasound treatment of the liver, an organ that moves while breathing. In the future, this could enable treatment of certain liver tumors in a more gentle way.

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  • Bone Metastases
    © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Physicians have long used visual judgment of medical images to determine the course of cancer treatment. A new program package from Fraunhofer researchers reveals changes in images and facilitates this task using deep learning. The experts will demonstrate this software in Chicago from November 27 to December 2 at RSNA, the world’s largest radiology meeting.

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  • The new robotic assistant requires just five minutes to position the needle.
    © Photo Fraunhofer IPA

    Finding the ideal position for interventional needles – as used in biopsies, for instance – is a difficult and time-consuming process. This can now be performed automatically, using a robotic arm to place a needle guide for the doctor at the optimal insertion point. With robotic assistance, doctors need five minutes to position the needle, as opposed to 30 minutes with conventional techniques. The solution will be shown at the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf from November 14 to 17, 2016 (Hall 10, Booth G05).

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  • Decision Support for Clinicians / 2016

    A Computer Simulation to Spare Children from Heart Surgery

    1.9.2016

    Simulation Blood Flow Aorta
    © Photo Fraunhofer MEVIS

    Children with congenital heart defects often undergo a battery of strenuous examinations and interventions. In the EU CARDIOPROOF project, Fraunhofer researchers have developed software to simulate certain interventions in advance. Preliminary results point to a reduced need to perform numerous interventions.

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